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The International Coordination Office for Polar Prediction and the Association for Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) invite the polar prediction community to share creative and artsy outcome of polar prediction research to be considered for publication in PolarPredictNews, the newsletter for the Year of Polar Prediction.

In the last four issues of PolarPredictNews scientific artwork has been combined into the design of the newsletter. "Art & Science" connects polar prediction-related science with the creative and artsy work of the polar prediction community. With this, we, the International Coordination Office for Polar Prediction (ICO) aim to provide a platform for the PPP community to share a side of their research which is beyond pure science but rather involves impressions, emotions, and creative and aesthetic ways to display scientific results. It offers a way to view science from a slightly different angle or perspective, which for some cases might even be more accessible than reading a paper or understanding at particular x-y plots.

In the latest PolarPredictNews, the melting sea-ice stripes produced by Thomas Rackow were published. Other contributions were by Taneil Uttal (Pieceful Pictures of the Day from MOSAiC Leg 2), Amy MacFarlane (Watercolour Drawings from MOSAiC Leg 3), and Friederike Krüger and Thomas Rackow (The Drawn Distributed MOSAiC Network). You can find all issues of PolarPredictNews at https://www.polarprediction.net/news/polarpredictnews/.

As we like to continue to highlight artistic pieces resulting from the scientific achievements of YOPP and PPP, we warmly invite you to share your creative outcome with us to be considered for publication in one of the next PolarPredictNews issues. No matter if you already have produced something or always needed a motivation to do so – this is your chance to show it to your colleagues; may it be a result from your latest field work experience or an outcome of your newest model's weather forecast skills which you captured in pencil drawings, oil paintings or artistic photographs; even if you've transferred it into knitted pieces – we are open for pretty much everything that relates to your research contributing to improved Arctic and Antarctic weather and sea-ice forecasts.